The RLG Lynx Plus Is a Budget Gaming Powerhouse

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The hunt for a gaming PC that can max out everything whilst also being in a budget that won’t stretch your wallet is a challenge. The challenge usually ends in a compromise of you forgoing some features to keep things within budget. This then haunts your every waking moment leaving you an emotional wreck. OK Maybe that was a bit too dramatic but you get the general idea. Basically the Holy Grail of a mid range Gaming PC is to get a constant 60FPS at 1080p. This in turn should not cost an arm and a leg. One possible contender for this spot is the RLG Lynx Plus.

We reviewed another RLG System back in 2015 which was the RLG Sniper. Fully decked out at around LKR 185,000/- and capable of handling almost everything and the kitchen sink thrown at it, the only issue with the Sniper was the price. This is where the RLG Lynx Plus comes into the game (literally).

Starting at a price of LKR 101,000/- and capping off at LKR 130,000/-, the RLG Lynx Plus is available at Redline Technologies in a number of variants in terms of the Graphics card model. What I will take a look at is the RLG Lynx Plus with the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060 6GB. This is the highest end in the RLG Lynx Plus lineup and I felt it would best showcase the system’s gaming capabilities and what it has to offer. Now that that’s all settled, onwards with the review.

The RLG Lynx Plus

Straight off the bat the first thing you notice about the RLG Lynx Plus is that it has a bit of a minimalist design with a touch of aggressiveness thrown in for good measure. Wrapped in a black and red color scheme, the PC actually looks like it has a face on the front with two diagonal slits that light up in red along with a grill at the bottom of the face that also houses a 120MM red LED fan. The chassis or casing is sturdily built from a mix of Plastic for the front grill and metal for the side panels and frame of the case. This gives it a rigidity that helps keeps all the components in place. So you can be assured that it won’t warp or bend when transporting the system.

RLG Lynx Plus
The Front of the RLG Lynx Plus
Image Credits: Mahesh de Andrado

Located at the top of the casing are one USB 3.0 port, one USB 2.0 port, a headphone jack, a microphone jack and the Power and Reset buttons. The front also has a drive bay for an Optical Drive such as a CD/DVD drive or Blu-Ray drive and located below that you will also find a drive bay for a 3.5” Floppy disk drive. Both of these are rather obsolete with people opting for high capacity storage drives rather than rely on discs.

RLG Lynx Plus
Image Credits: Mahesh de Andrado

The left side of the RLG Lynx Plus has an acrylic side panel so that you can see the inner components of the system along with the lighting as well.

RLG Lynx Plus
Image Credits: Mahesh de Andrado

In terms of inner lighting, the system features red 120MM fans in the front and rear of the case along with a custom LED CPU cooler as well. Located at the back of the system you will find a number of USB 2.0 and 3.0 ports, and an RJ-45 LAN port, all of which are on the motherboard. In terms of audio, the RLG Lynx Plus supports 6 channel (5.1) audio so that you can enjoy your games in surround sound. If you’re looking to connect the system to a TV or high resolution display, you can take your pick from DVI, HDMI and DisplayPort.

Inside the RLG Lynx Plus

The inner components of the RLG Lynx Plus are essentially the same as any regular PC. As such, the system ships out with the latest quad core 7th Generation Intel Core i5 7500 Processor backed up by 8GB of DDR4 RAM. This ensures that apart from handling all your gaming needs, the RLG Lynx Plus can also double as a workhorse as well, tackling tasks such as Photoshop, Lightroom and even a bit of animation and 3D rendering as well. Just because it’s a gaming PC, it doesn’t mean that it can’t do anything else either.

RLG Lynx Plus
Image Credits: Mahesh de Andrado

In terms of graphical performance, which as we have come to establish is the core indicator behind a gaming PC, the RLG Lynx Plus packs a 6GB Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060. An alternative to this graphics card would be from AMD with their Radeon RX480 4GB graphics card. In terms of performance, both cards are more or less equal in performance with Nvidia pushing ahead with the extra 2GB of VRAM (not that it makes a difference when you’re gaming at 1080p).

RLG Lynx Plus
Image Credits: Mahesh de Andrado

What good is a Gaming PC if you don’t have space to store your games, right? With that regard, the RLG Lynx Plus sports a 1TB 7200RPM Hard disk drive. The RPM indicates how many times the platter inside will spin per minute. Usually, the higher the RPM rates, the speedier your application responsiveness is. If you want more speed, you can also opt for a Solid State drive which starts off at LKR. 8,000/-

RLG LYnx Plus
Image Credits: Mahesh de Andrado

Connecting all these components together is the Motherboard. The H110 chipset motherboard in the system is either from Gigabyte, Asus or MSI. In terms of expandability, the motherboard has 2 RAM slots, a PCIe x16 slot for the graphics card, 4 SATA ports for Hard drives and Optical drives, and a PCI expansion slot should you need to plug in an additional card such as a network card or a sound card. Unless you’re going to be using a high end network card or a sound card, we really don’t see the point in getting these cards as the motherboard has both these feature inbuilt and is perfectly capable of getting the job done.

RLG Lynx Plus
Image Credits: Mahesh de Andrado

Powering up all this is the Power supply unit, which would be from either Corsair or FSP. With the GTX 1060 being a relatively low wattage card, there’s no need for a 750W or 1000W PSU, rather, a 450W PSU is all that is needed to power the RLG Lynx Plus.

RLG Lynx Plus
Image Credits: Mahesh de Andrado

Putting the RLG Lynx Plus through its paces

We’ve seen the RLG Lynx Plus talk the talk, but the real question is, can it walk the walk? The best way to find an answer to that question is to see exactly how well the RLG Lynx Plus handles gaming. In order to do this, I used a number of benchmark designed to stress the graphics processing unit to its most extreme. The tools of the trade for this task were 3DMark, Unigine Valley and Unigine Heaven. All benchmarks were carried out at a resolution of 1920×1080 aka Full HD with all settings maxed out.

3DMark Time Spy

3DMark has a suite of benchmarks that can be run to gauge the gaming performance of a system. One such benchmark is Time Spy. It makes use of the new DirectX 12 runtime which means that the benchmark is extremely stressful on your graphics card. The benchmark consists of two scenes, each running for a duration of around 2-3 minutes. At the end of the benchmark, individual scores in terms of FPS or frames per second is given.

RLG Lynx Plus
Image Credits: Mahesh de Andrado

As you can see from the screenshot above, the GTX 1060 keeps an average of 27.66FPS in the first test and 24.44FPS in the second test. While not being the ideal frame rate, it also goes to show exactly how detailed and stressful DirectX 12 actually is.

3DMark Fire Strike is up next.

This rigorously tests DirectX 11 performance. Again, the goal here is to see of the GTX 1060 and as a whole the RLG Linx+ can deliver a smooth gaming experience at Full HD.

RLG Lynx Plus
Image Credits: Mahesh de Andrado

As you can see from the screenshot, the benchmark scores show 64.11FPS in the first test and 54.15FPS in the second test. This essentially means that at DirectX 11, the system with a GTX 1060 should have no issues giving 50-60FPS with all the bells and whistles turned on.

Next up is 3DMark Sky Diver.

This too is another benchmark based on DirectX 11 Unlike Fire Strike which is aimed at modern DirectX 11 games on ultra-high settings, Sky Diver is more like running a game at ye normal setting. That doesn’t make it any less stressful though. As you can see below, Sky Diver racks in a total of 199.19 FPS in the first test and 209.05 FPS in the second test. This means that the RLG Lynx Plus and indeed the GTX 1060 in it is extremely capable of running DirectX 11 games at normal settings with ample room to crank things up.

RLG Lynx Plus
Image Credits: Mahesh de Andrado

Unigine Heaven and Unigine Valley are the next benchmarks I ran

These too are based on DirectX 11 and help bring out the intricate details such as soft shadows and tessellation as well. Both benchmarks ran with all settings maxed out and were able to get very impressive scores of 65.7 and 67.0 FPS for Heaven and Valley respectively proving that the RLG Lynx Plus with a GTX 1060 can deliver 60FPS across most games thrown at it.

RLG Lynx Plus
Image Credits: Mahesh de Andrado

Graphical benchmarks aside, I also decided to benchmark the system itself to give a rough idea on the system temperatures. Prime95 was the weapon of choice here as it has the ability to stress all CPU cores and also generate the maximum possible heat in order to gauge the temperature of the system.

RLG Lynx Plus
Image Credits: Mahesh de Andrado

Reaching a maximum of 76 Celsius, the RLG Lynx Plus manages to stay relatively stable at that temperature without shutting down which means the CPU cooler is indeed doing its job well. It should be noted that these tests are not at all realistic and that the PC will never be stressed to this limit when gaming. Nonetheless, in the event the system is put under this sort of strain, it can handle it.

Warranty and After sales service

As with the RLG Sniper and in fact all RLG Systems, the RLG Lynx Plus comes with a 3 comprehensive warranty. So if any component should fail within the 3 years, the faulty component will be replaced immediately. You’ll also be entitled to a lifetime service warranty so all those clean ups are free of charge.

As with all RLG Systems, the RLG Lynx Plus too has a sticker attached to the panel to prevent unauthorized tampering. That means if you are not an authorized technician, under no circumstances can you disassemble the PC. Doing so completely voids your warranty so be careful.

If the Lynx Plus is out of your budget, you can opt for its little brother, the RLG Lynx. This has a solid side panel rather than the Acrylic panel and comes with a 7th Generation Core i3 processor. In terms of Graphics cards, you the RLG Lynx would have the 3GB version of the GTX 1060 or the Radeon RX 470.

If you’re on the lookout for a new Gaming PC that can handle most games at Full HD without breaking open the bank, you can try out the RLG Lynx Plus. The folks over at Redline Technologies are ever willing to answer all your questions and can also even let you run some games on the PC so that you can see for yourself how it performs before you purchase the system.

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